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Welcome to the Association of Credit Management in Switzerland

 

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Swiss News

Switzerland is no longer a cinematic island

The traditional image of Swiss cinema lies on the cutting room floor. International co-productions have become the norm and a significant number of young film-makers have an immigrant background or were born abroad. Many live and work outside Switzerland.  Of the 15 Swiss films recently shown at the 13th Zurich Film Festival (ZFF), only a third were made by Swiss directors living in Switzerland.  “People talk a lot about Swiss cinema here in a very nationalistic way. But I’m not nationalistic at all in my perception of the world,” Berlin-based Katharina Wyss, director of “Sarah joue un loup-garou” (Sarah Plays a Werewolf), her first feature film, tells swissinfo.ch.  “That said, my film is very ‘Fribourgeois’: it’s geographically and personally based around Fribourg; it’s nurtured by the city I come from.”  “But I’m also influenced by long-established European culture, especially the German and French culture that I grew up with and which gives all my work a very European ...

The stolen childhood of the factory children

During the industrial revolution, children slaved away in Swiss factories to the point of collapse. A political outsider is to thank for the fact that child labour was banned relatively early. “Workers sought: Two big working families with children capable of work will be well cared-for at a spinning works.” With this advertisement placed in the Anzeiger von Uster gazette, a Swiss factory owner was looking for employees in the 1870s. It was a matter of course that the children of labourers had to work too. Child labour was nothing new when the first factories opened, but the industrial revolution turned it from a day-to-day reality into exploitation. Peasants and home-workers saw their children primarily as labourers before the industrial revolution. The family was first and foremost a labour unit; working children were essential for its livelihood. As soon as a child was old enough, he or she helped out in the farmyard or the workshop. But they were spared the more demanding ...

Why Switzerland feels like ‘heimat’

The German term 'heimat' means, roughly, having a home or a sense of belonging. The term can have profound meaning for members of the Swiss diaspora. For Beth Zurbuchen, president of the Swiss Center of North America, connections to "heimat" are both very personal and an integral part of her everyday work.  People living in Switzerland have their own perspectives on the term, an issue explored by a current exhibit on "heimat" at the museum Stapferhaus in Lenzburg. As part of the exhibit, organisers asked people riding the Ferris wheel at fun fairs around Switzerland different questions around what home and belonging means to them. Zurbuchen recently spoke at the Stapferhaus about her experiences finding "heimat" and her work with members of the Swiss community in North America. (Additional footage courtesy of the Stapferhaus Lenzburg).

Swiss help to illuminate the Middle Ages

Researchers at the University of Fribourg hope to reveal more about the Middle Ages by piecing together fragments of manuscripts.  (RTS/swissinfo.ch) In medieval times, the vellum of discarded manuscripts was not thrown away, but reused as bookbinding material to strengthen or decorate new volumes. Thus, over time, hundreds of thousands of manuscript fragments became scattered all over the world. Twelve different research teams in leading manuscript libraries across Europe and the US are now working together on significant fragments for a research platform called Fragmentarium. Using this platform, reproductions of medieval fragments can be uploaded from different servers, catalogued, scientifically described, transcribed, and collated online. By properly identifying and studying these fragments, historians hope to create a more accurate picture of the Middle Ages. The University of Fribourg is leading the project, because it has dominated the field of digital manuscript ...

The legal difficulties of online expression in Switzerland

Drawing the line between freedom of expression and discrimination was difficult enough in the pre-Internet era. Social media and instant communication have made it a nuanced minefield, as a case in Switzerland shows. Last week in the western Swiss town of Delémont, an altercation between two boys outside the train station was filmed, then posted online. It showed one approaching the other, throwing him to the ground, before both went their separate ways. Some 50,000 views and 20,000 shares later, the video was taken down by the mother of the assaulted teenager on the advice of local police. The reason? Many of the (hundreds of) comments below the video focused on ethnicity: the aggressor was black, the victim was white, and the discussion veered into a spiralling storm of abuse, much of it anti-immigrant. Before the boy’s attacker had even been found, the regional prosecutor’s office had warned that any further comments inciting hatred or retribution would be pursued and ...

 

Short facts about us

The Association of Credit Management Switzerland counts more than 400 members and interested persons. We put our main efforts in building networks and exchanging knowledge between Credit Managers in Switzerland and beyond.

 

Currently there is a team of Credit Managers working on following projects :

If you would like to read more about our activities please to go to bullet point Activities in the table of contents to the left.

 

 

 

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